Introductory Glimpses of Evolvability for Biologists

By Matthew Andres Moreno on October 20, 2017 in Research, Review / 0 Comments
Introductory Glimpses of Evolvability for Biologists

This is one of a series of posts on evolvability. It is based off my undergraduate thesis, which I wrote at the University of Puget Sound under advisors Dr. America Chambers and Dr. Adam Smith. The original thesis is available here. Introductory Glimpses of Evolvability for Biologists The idea that phenotypic outcomes of mutation are non-arbitrary can be unfamiliar, or even uncomfortable, to biologists [Kirschner and Gerhart, 2005, p 219]. It is consensus among evolutionary biologists that genetic mutation is random. The alternative — the theory of adaptive mutation — is controversial and widely discredited [Sniegowski and Lenski, 1995]. It is therefore essential to note that discussions of evolvability are not predicated on adaptive mutation. The key difference is that adaptive mutation hypothesizes that genetic mutation is non-arbitrary while discussions of evolvability center on the idea […]

Defining Evolvability

By Matthew Andres Moreno on October 13, 2017 in Research, Review / 0 Comments
Defining Evolvability

This is one of a series of posts on evolvability. It is based off my undergraduate thesis, which I wrote at the University of Puget Sound under advisors Dr. America Chambers and Dr. Adam Smith. The original thesis is available here. Defining Evolvability Figure 1 Some of my favorite biological phenotypes… biased towards cooperative photographic subjects! While biological phenotypic adaptation is indeed spectacular, another marvel of biology lurks just below our appreciation for phenotypes well-suited to their respective environments. It is hypothesized that biological organisms exhibit adaptation to the evolutionary process itself, not just to their environment over the course of their lifespans. That is, biological organisms are thought to possess traits that facilitate the evolutionary process. The term evolvability was coined to describe such traits. A general consensus exists in the literature that evolvability stems […]

Blog Series on Evolvability

By Matthew Andres Moreno on October 6, 2017 in Research, Review / 0 Comments

This is one of a series of posts on evolvability. It is based off my undergraduate thesis, which I wrote at the University of Puget Sound under advisors Dr. America Chambers and Dr. Adam Smith. The original thesis is available here. Blog Series on Evolvability I like digital evolution because it necessitates the examination of fundamental assumptions of what is necessary for evolution. Building a digital evolution system, a researcher must work out how the phenotypes that are being evolved should be genetically encoded. This decision raises an interesting question: how do genetic encodings for digital evolution systems influence the evolutionary process within these systems? I think this question is really interesting! Better understanding this question has practical implications for digital evolution, as well. So, I picked it up as the topic for my undergraduate thesis. […]

Attend ALife XV!

By Anya Vostinar on January 12, 2016 in News / 1 Comment
Attend ALife XV!

The ALife XV conference is taking place July 4-8 in Cancun, Mexico this year, and is shaping up to look like it’s going to be an exciting program. For those of you interested in presenting, papers or abstract submissions are due in just over a month.  We’re including the full Call for Papers below. A number of members of the Devolab are planning to go, so let us know if you will be there and would like to meet up! Call for Papers: The 2016 ALife Organizing Committee would like to cordially invite you to submit your work to “The Fifteenth International Conference on the Synthesis and Simulation of Living Systems”, taking place at the Cancun International Convention Center in Cancun, Mexico, on July 4-8, 2016.

Happy Holidays!

By Anya Vostinar on December 22, 2015 in Humor / 0 Comments
Happy Holidays!

Happy holidays to those celebrating this week! We don’t actually have snow around here strangely, but that doesn’t mean we can’t have fun. If you missed it last year, Emily did a wonderful recreation of A Christmas Carol, academic style! An Academic Christmas Carol: Part 1