Author: Matthew Andres Moreno

Defining Evolvability

By Matthew Andres Moreno on October 13, 2017 in Research, Review / 0 Comments
Defining Evolvability

This is one of a series of posts on evolvability. It is based off my undergraduate thesis, which I wrote at the University of Puget Sound under advisors Dr. America Chambers and Dr. Adam Smith. The original thesis is available here. Defining Evolvability Figure 1 Some of my favorite biological phenotypes… biased towards cooperative photographic subjects! While biological phenotypic adaptation is indeed spectacular, another marvel of biology lurks just below our appreciation for phenotypes well-suited to their respective environments. It is hypothesized that biological organisms exhibit adaptation to the evolutionary process itself, not just to their environment over the course of their lifespans. That is, biological organisms are thought to possess traits that facilitate the evolutionary process. The term evolvability was coined to describe such traits. A general consensus exists in the literature that evolvability stems […]

Blog Series on Evolvability

By Matthew Andres Moreno on October 6, 2017 in Research, Review / 0 Comments

This is one of a series of posts on evolvability. It is based off my undergraduate thesis, which I wrote at the University of Puget Sound under advisors Dr. America Chambers and Dr. Adam Smith. The original thesis is available here. Blog Series on Evolvability I like digital evolution because it necessitates the examination of fundamental assumptions of what is necessary for evolution. Building a digital evolution system, a researcher must work out how the phenotypes that are being evolved should be genetically encoded. This decision raises an interesting question: how do genetic encodings for digital evolution systems influence the evolutionary process within these systems? I think this question is really interesting! Better understanding this question has practical implications for digital evolution, as well. So, I picked it up as the topic for my undergraduate thesis. […]