Overview of Early Avida Work

By Joshua Nahum on November 24, 2015 in Information, Review / 1 Comment
Overview of Early Avida Work

Back in 2005, I was tasked to pick an article written by a science journalist and write a summary of it for my AP Biology class. During those days, I would frequent the library to read science magazines like Scientific American and Popular Science. Little did I know, the article I found would profoundly shape my career to this day. I chose the cover article for the February 2005 edition of Discover titled: “Testing Darwin” by Carl Zimmer. The article described the work done at Michigan State University to study evolution in a completely different system than DNA-based life. Carl Zimmer, who continues to be my favorite science journalist, described experiments studying the rise of complex features, evolution that generated diverse ecologies, altruism, the benefits of sexual recombination, among other ideas, but all using the digital evolution platform, […]

Writing in the Sciences Online Class

By Anya Vostinar on November 17, 2015 in Information / 0 Comments
Writing in the Sciences Online Class

I recently finished taking an online course through Stanford’s Lagunita online learning site. The course was “Medicine: SciWrite Writing in the Sciences” and was an online version of a class that is offered in person at Stanford from what I can tell. This was the first online class I had ever taken and I decided to try it originally because I’m done with taking classes for my PhD and honestly craved a bit of structure as I started my first semester of pure research. I also hear on a regular basis how important strong writing skills are to scientists no matter where you end up, so this class seemed a good thing to try. While the class is apparently through the medical school and the examples made that clear, I found that the information pertained to […]

What goes on in a closed-door defense session?

By Mike Wiser on November 10, 2015 in Graduate School, Information / 0 Comments
What goes on in a closed-door defense session?

Last week, I defended my dissertation. While I knew how to prepare the written dissertation, and the public talk, the third component – the closed-door session in which my committee examined me – was mysterious. I’d asked about 8 people over the years what their closed-door sessions were like, and all of them told me that they couldn’t remember. So, while my experience might not be typical, it is at least an experience, and thus potentially a useful data point. Your mileage may vary.

Review of “Why do bacteria regulate public goods by quorum sensing?”

By Anya Vostinar on November 3, 2015 in Review / 0 Comments
Review of “Why do bacteria regulate public goods by quorum sensing?”

Bacteria flourish in nearly every place on Earth imaginable including in and on humans. They also reproduce and therefore evolve much more quickly than we do, so understanding their evolution is vital to every aspect of our lives. A surprisingly common strategy for bacteria ­- controlling everything from virulence to production of useful resources such as cellulase -­ is a form of communication called quorum sensing. Bacterial cells using quorum sensing consistently produce a signal molecule and then detect the concentration of that molecule in the surrounding area. The bacteria generally have a signal­-molecule density threshold, called a quorum, that triggers them to start performing a new behavior. The behaviors controlled by quorum sensing are usually only useful if there are enough organisms doing them at the same time. Producing public goods such as light or enzymes […]

Avida/Software Carpentry Hybrid Workshop

By Emily Dolson on October 20, 2015 in Information / 0 Comments
Avida/Software Carpentry Hybrid Workshop

This weekend, Josh, Cliff, and I ran a Software Carpentry workshop targeted at people interested in learning to use Avida for their research. After taking the instructor training course in May, we realized that the core skills covered in Software Carpentry (shell scripting, git, and a programming language) align very well with the skills needed to use Avida. The only thing left to do was drop a lesson on Avida in as the fourth session! Since there has been an ever-growing group of biologists interested in learning to use Avida, this seemed like a good idea. So, this weekend, we gave it a try.